Christina Aguilera’s Daughter Has Played Pokémon Legends: Arceus, Apparently

In one of the more bizarre headlines of the day, Christina Aguilera's daughter has apparently played Pokémon Legends: Arceus early.

In an interview with Elle.com (as spotted by Nintendo Life), the American actress and singer told the outlet that her daughter had played Arceus during a day on set filming an advert for the Nintendo Switch. In the interview, Aguilera said, “[While shooting the campaign], my daughter was able to fall in love with a new game."

"We had a brief moment to [try out] Pokémon Legends: Arceus. It's so gorgeous, the graphics and the setting that you get to explore in, so she was loving that so much, she wouldn't give me a turn. But that was on set and yeah, it's just such a great way for your family to connect.”

The advert starring Aguilera can be seen above. During the commercial, the star can be seen playing alongside her family on a number of games including Super Mario 3D World, Animal Crossing New Horizons, and the Nintendo Switch version of Big Brain Academy. As part of her interview with Elle, the singer spoke about her longstanding relationship with Nintendo, describing herself as a diehard fan.

“I was playing the Nintendo NES, and I think that was the first one where you had your Marios, your Donkey Kongs," she says when speaking about her first memories of the company. "So I go way back, and honestly, to this day, you can still find some gaming systems. I literally have the arcade games too in my house, so that's what a diehard fan I am of Nintendo.”

Aguilera isn't the only star to have starred in recent adverts for the company. Aside from the actress and songwriter, Nintendo have shot further Switch commercials starring the likes of Jessica Alba and Neil Patrick Harris alongside their respective families.

As for Pokémon Legends: Arceus, the game is due out January 28, 2022. For more from the game, make sure to check out this article detailing how Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl might tease Arceus... with a myth.

Jared Moore is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter.

New Judge Dredd Comic Features Crossover With Sylvester Stallone & Karl Urban Movies

Judge Dredd fans are in for a special treat this holiday season. The latest issue of Rebellion's 2000AD magazine features a very unlikely pop culture crossover, as the comic book version of Dredd meets his cinematic counterparts.

That's right, this new story teams the classic Judge Dredd with the versions played by Sylvester Stallone in 1995's Judge Dredd movie and Karl Urban in 2012's Dredd. Even Dredd is getting into the multiverse game now.

IGN can exclusively debut a page from this upcoming story, featuring all three versions of the iconic lawman crossing paths for the first time. Check it out below:

This bizarre crossover will be explored in a new 11-page story in the upcoming Christmas edition of 2000AD. The story is written by Ken Niemand and drawn by Richard Elson. There's no word yet on whether this crossover is a one-off event or if the Stallone and Urban Dredds might stick around the pages of 2000AD.

2000AD subscribers will receive this issue on Saturday, December 11, and it'll be available for individual purchase online and through the 2000AD app on Thursday, December 16.

It's especially nice seeing Urban's Dredd back in action, considering the lack of recent news on the Dredd sequel front. The 2012 film received a comic book follow-up in 2014, renewing calls for a full-fledged sequel. In 2017 we learned a TV series called Judge Dredd: Mega-City One is in the works, with Urban in talks to reprise his role. Sadly, there's been little word since, apart from a glimpse of some early concept art.

Jesse is a mild-mannered staff writer for IGN. Allow him to lend a machete to your intellectual thicket by following @jschedeen on Twitter.

Game Developer Accuses Real-Life Weapons Manufacturer of Stealing Its Gun Design… Twice

The developers at indie studio Ward B really like designing fictional guns. The small team has been posting highly detailed weapon designs for its in-development game, Oceanic, since 2019. Crucial to the team’s work – and the small following around Oceanic’s development – is that while the weapons in question are meant to reflect tech created 200 years in the future, they must look like they could feasibly work in reality.

“We're looking to have them very, very scientifically explainable,” CEO Marcellino Sauceda tells me. “There's actually a few weapons we ended up scrapping and not putting in the game because there were design flaws that we weren't too happy with in the end.”

In fact, Ward B’s commitment to believability was so strong that, in early 2020, Maxim Kuzin arrived in Sauceda’s inbox. A contractor for Russia’s largest weapons manufacturer, Kalashnikov Concern, Kuzin asked for permission to turn one of Ward B’s fictional weapons into a real-life shotgun. For Sauceda, it wouldn’t just be recognition of his team’s hard work, it would be a genuine milestone for the industry – to his knowledge, it would mark the first time a video game gun had been turned into a physical, mass-market model.

“It's huge. There's no game studio today that collaborated with a weapon manufacturer to make a fully operational firearm. And we would have been the OGs of that.” Sauceda stops for a second. “But they've completely ripped that opportunity from us.”

Sauceda never gave his formal permission for the gun to be adapted for real life – and yet Kalashnikov Concern subsequently announced a weapon kit that bears what Sauceda sees as a striking resemblance to one of Ward B’s own creations. The company now alleges that Kalashnikov Concern not only stole its weapon design but, in a bizarre twist, subsequently granted an entirely separate video game the rights to use it.

"They've completely ripped the opportunity from us.”

Meet the Mastodon

Oceanic is a science fiction first-person hero shooter, and the debut game for Ward B – a 40-person team working mostly part-time, but with experience developing the likes of Call of Duty, Halo, Overwatch, and Destiny. “We don't have anything under our belt yet, we're completely indie,” explains Sauceda. “Most of us come from AAA backgrounds. We are not particularly, like, funded quite yet.”

The goal, then, is to build a game that can attract the necessary investment, before going full-time on development – and that has meant Ward B’s done whatever it can to get the word out about Oceanic. In its early stages, the studio saw its best success when showing off weapons.

Since the project’s earliest days, Ward B has shown off Oceanic’s arsenal, filling a devblog with immensely complex renders and in-universe explainer text. On February 18, 2020, the team revealed its take on a futuristic shotgun, named the EPM28 Mastodon. Just like all the others, this post included multiple images of the new gun rendered in different colours, with individual components shown off, as well as in-game stats and an in-engine screenshot. To say it caused a splash on social media would be an overstatement, but it was enough to pique the interest of an unexpected party.

Just over a month after the post, in an email seen by IGN, an individual billing himself as a “producer of industrial projects” for multiple companies – including Kalashnikov Concern – introduced himself to Sauceda with a pitch. Maxim Kuzin had seen the Mastodon’s early renders via the portfolio of a concept artist Ward B had worked with, and wanted to pitch Kalashnikov on using the fictional design as a gun kit for its real-life MP-155 shotgun. Essentially, it would see the Mastodon’s futuristic looks wrapped around an existing weapon, and would potentially be followed by airsoft and toy versions of the weapon. In return Ward B would replace Oceanic’s in-game branding with that of Kalashnikov. In a response to IGN, Kuzin confirmed the above, but said his conversations with Ward B were "preliminary".

Sauceda was excited by the idea, and organised a call with Kuzin to finalise it. “He stated in there that [we would] be credited for this collaboration: ‘Kalashnikov Concern will be showcasing your name, you'll have a brand on the gun,’ and all that stuff,” Sauceda says. “And he said that we would receive three units of the finished product. They would ship it out [to the US] – without internals of course, because they have sanctions – but he laid out the whole groundwork of what's going to happen.” Kuzin didn't respond to a request for comment about what was said in the Skype call.

Sauceda and his team loved the idea, and said they’d be happy to sign contracts to formalise the deal. But the contracts never arrived, and neither Kuzin nor Kalashnikov Concern got in touch.

Ward B assumed that Kuzin's pitch to Kalashnikov hadn’t gone well, and that the deal had simply fallen through. Disheartened but not defeated, the team kept working on Oceanic as usual – until someone on the team spotted a Kalashnikov announcement for a weapon that looked very familiar.

Ultima Goes Online

“The day they first announced it and they showed it off, the concept artist came to me and they were like, ‘Hey, they finally made our shotgun!’”

Kalashnikov announced the MP-155 Ultima on August 21, 2020. While the internal components in the gun are identical to the original MP-155, its external chassis is very different. Equipped with an angular design, multiple colour schemes, reflex sight, and even an in-built computer that includes camera support, ammunition readouts, and a digital compass, it’s a design that Kalashnikov openly says is inspired by video games.

Sauceda contends that it was inspired by one video game.

The more the Ward B team looked at the design, the more convinced they became that the MP-155 Ultima was based on Oceanic’s Mastodon. Aside from the general sci-fi aesthetic, color choices, and overall shape of the weapon, Sauceda points to multiple smaller similarities between the two designs, many of which are decisions that were taken for aesthetic reasons in Oceanic, but have no practical purpose in real life (see gallery, below, for Ward B's specific comparisons). Elements of the handguard, receiver, and more appear to Sauceda to have been replicated on the Ultima, despite him seeing no utilitarian reason for their addition.

For Ward B, the clincher was the inclusion of a small indentation on one side of the Ultima – a horizontal L shape with a small line emerging from the corner (also seen in the gallery above). It’s a tiny detail, but one Sauceda sees as crucial, as the team has used it as a visual motif on not just the Mastodon, but multiple Oceanic guns. “Nothing about this gives the receiver stability, it has nothing to do with it because everything is functioning through the internals,” says Sauceda of that design choice. “The fact that they included this indent is kind of... it's sketchy, because I kind of feel they have the [Mastodon’s 3D model] and they forgot to exclude that part – because they did remove it on the other side with the bolt.”

On the day the Ultima was announced, the developer’s first thought was that the deal must have gone ahead after all, and that something had gone wrong on the admin side. “I was going to the page saying, ‘Oh, maybe they mentioned Ward B’ – but they clearly didn't,” he explains. The announcement included no mention of other companies in the Ultima’s creation. Sauceda’s first step was to email Kuzin: “I didn't want to make a scene to their legal department right away. And I was like, ‘The papers weren't delivered, they weren't signed. We're just checking that this collaboration’s still going through as planned.’”

“We were quiet because we thought that things were going to be going good,” Sauceda recalls, sadly. “We thought that even though he didn't send contracts to us, we felt that, OK, maybe he'll still go by his word. And even though he didn't send it and the gun's already [been revealed] we were being quiet, hoping that things would be done properly, that it was just delayed or something like that. But I already had an idea in my mind that he was definitely not going to come back. They completely stole it.”

Kuzin never replied to Ward B's emails.

"I already had an idea in my mind that he was definitely not going to come back. They completely stole it."

In a response to IGN, Kuzin tells a slightly different story. The contractor says that, alongside his first contact with Ward B, he had begun an independent investigation into the developer and Oceanic and, "found that the company does not have enough of its own funds to complete the development, there are no investors, [and] the release date is unknown," meaning it was too risky to work with the company. Ward B says that it's in the process of acquiring funding at this point, and contends that Kuzin used the company's early state as an excuse to simply take the design rather than work together legitimately.

Kuzin also says that Ward B had not paid the Mastodon concept artist, making negotiating weapon licensing impossible, as there was no clear ownership. Ward B says that, while the artist had not been paid at the time of their conversation, they were on a deferred payment plan from the beginning, and have now received payment. Ward B also points out that the concept artist specifically referred Kuzin to Ward B when asked about the design (which IGN can confirm, having seen messages between them), and that all the artist's renders included Oceanic branding on them – the developer sees this as a clear, early indication as to who owns the license.

Kuzin says that, having abandoned the Ward B plan, he then went on to work with "another designer from Russia" to create the Ultima's design "from scratch", and pointed IGN to a patent as proof of the design's originality. Kuzin says he also received confirmation of the originality of the design from the Russia Designers Association, in documents IGN has seen. Those documents list a number of real and fictional weapons – including the Mastodon – that were used as comparison points to the MP-155 Ultima design, before certifying it as original.

Sauceda doesn't see this as proof enough: "Filing for a patent means nothing, there's plenty of cases where a patent gets disputed due to provided evidence." When it comes to Kuzin's claims of creating the design from scratch, Sauceda remains defiant: "We've heard that they made sketches from scratch as well, but redrawing an existing design doesn't make it yours just because you have your own sketches of something you stole. Sounds like Kuzin is implying tracing our design on paper then bringing it into the real world and adding an Apple Watch onto it changes it from theft to innovation."

After being unable to contact Kuzin, Sauceda went directly to Kalashnikov Concern with his worries about the design. According to Sauceda, Kalashnikov also insisted that it had developed the Ultima from scratch, and that its executives had never seen the Mastodon design.

Sauceda says he thinks he can prove that’s not the case.

Little vs. Large

By September 2020, Ward B had sent Kalashnikov Concern a cease-and-desist order. The company didn’t comply, or even reply. A month later, Ward B issued DMCA takedowns for online posts featuring the MP-155 Ultima. This time, Kalashnikov did reply – in an email seen by IGN, a Kalashnikov Intellectual Property department representative requested that the takedown orders be withdrawn, insisting that the design had been used entirely legally. Kalashnikov said that the MP-155 Ultima design was created alongside AMA, a separate company that works with Kalashnikov for sports and hunting weaponry.

The email ends by asking Ward B to provide proof of its ownership of Ultima’s design. Sauceda says Ward B withdrew the takedown requests, and sent along its proof, but says that Kalashnikov Concern’s IP department never replied from that point onwards.

It felt as though Ward B was hitting a brick wall, until Sauceda was sent a message that he thinks proves what he initially suspected.

The message, sent by an anonymous source and seen by IGN, showed Kuzin seemingly attempting to buy the design for the Mastodon from the gun's concept artist, even after having spoken to Ward B. “So did they pay for your shotgun or we can buy it to stop the conflict with them shortly?” the message reads. “Cause there are lawyers connected from both side now and truly it seems like a spoiling of time [sic],” reads the message. Kuzin did not provide a response to IGN when asked about this message.

Sauceda says that the concept artist had retained no rights to the Mastodon’s design, and that their work was directed entirely by Ward B – in his eyes, this proves that Kuzin had decided to try and use the design without Ward B’s involvement. That wasn’t all he learned. Another leaked image, included in the gallery below, shows a design flowchart – branded with KDNMX (Kuzin’s personal web address), and Korolev Dynamics (a company Kuzin is seemingly a part of) – that includes a render of the Mastodon, an image of the original MP-155, and a series of designs that attempt to combine the two into a new weapon. While the final MP-155 Ultima design is not part of that chart, Sauceda sees it as proof that Kuzin was using Mastodon renders as part of his pitch to Kalashnikov. Kuzin did not acknowledge the KDNMX-branded designs that included images of the Mastodon when asked about them.

In a series of separate messages also seen by IGN, Kuzin seemingly makes contact with another artist, linking to a post featuring the Mastodon, saying the design is “soo cool”, and that he wants a similar one, apparently to bring to Kalashnikov. Kuzin even says that the new artist could just “get the existing renders and put the Kalashnikov logo on it”. Kuzin did not provide a response when asked about these messages.

Sauceda was sent the images subsequently made for Kalashnikov – they are indeed versions of the original Mastodon renders with the Kalashnikov brand name replacing Oceanic's brand name. On one image, the Kalashnikov logo has also been added to the gun render itself. You can see comparisons of the original renders with the versions allegedly sent to Kalashnikov in the gallery above. In the messages, Kuzin replies to the artist involved saying, “realy [sic] impressive gun! Just sent all pics to Kalashnikov vice president”. Kuzin did not respond to a request for comment on whether he had spoken to that vice-president.

Sauceda sees this final set of messages as proof that not just Kuzin, but Kalashnikov as a whole, took and used his company’s designs without credit.

“We've talked to them,” he explains. “We've talked to their legal department. The funny thing is they claim that their vice-president isn't aware of our design or even who Ward B is. We showed them the exact renders that were rebranded, and Maxim Kuzin stated in a message between him and his artist that he sent these to the vice president. And so they lied – they completely lied on their part that they're unaware of us.”

Kalashnikov Concern did not reply to multiple requests for comment.

Kuzin replies to the artist involved saying, “Just sent all pics to Kalashnikov vice president”. 

Tarkov Escapades

“This shotgun went through a few revisions. I think that's why we take it a bit more personally,” Sauceda tells me. “We were very, very picky about this design, and it came to be for that reason. It wasn't just something we threw in there like, ‘Oh, we'll just make a shotgun.’ I mean, we [create] all these weapons with pretty much pure heart in everything we design. So we take it personal that they're claiming it as their own when it's clearly not.”

At time of writing, Kalashnikov Concern has begun taking pre-orders for the MP-155 Ultima, priced at around $1,700 USD / £1,300. It’s received worldwide press attention for its unusual design and video game inspiration – far beyond the normal spheres of coverage for a new weapon.

On the other hand, Ward B went almost completely dark after it began to suspect that its designs were being used elsewhere without permission. Oceanic only reappeared around a year later, with Ward B showing off more of the Mastodon, assuring fans that the game was still in development, and hinting at the reasons for that lengthy disappearance. “Undergoing private development does hurt,” Sauceda tells me, “we loved showing off what our talents can achieve during development, but this approach was needed to prevent future cases such as this one.”

And yet there was one more twist to come. Earlier this year, ultra-realistic shooter Escape From Tarkov added a fully-branded in-game kit for the MP-155 Ultima to its digital arsenal in June – presumably as part of a licensing deal with Kalashnikov. You can see images of the Escape from Tarkov version of the weapon in the gallery above. Ward B repeatedly emailed Tarkov developer Battlestate Games to say that it saw this as an unauthorized use of its designs, but Sauceda says he never received a reply.

Effectively, Sauceda believes that a version of his studio’s gun design made it into someone else’s game before it could ever have been released as part of his own. Sauceda sees this not just as a major loss of potential exposure for his little studio, but a huge factor for morale.

“A lot of the people that were working on the shotgun with us, every day they wake up and they see the Ultima, or they hear people talking about it,” Sauceda says. “It's completely demotivated a lot of us because it feels like [we could just be] making something, just for some international corporate-ran business to just take everything from us.”

Despite multiple requests for comment from IGN, Battlestate Games failed to reply.

Sauceda believes a version of the Mastodon made it into someone else’s game before it could ever have been part of Oceanic.

The Short Arm of the Law

Ward B has, by this point, given up on any formal legal case. “We came to the point of realization that, due to Kalashnikov Concern being out of the country, filing any official legal action would require us to be present in Russia, which our funding would unfortunately not cover,” Sauceda tells me. “We've dropped the goal of reclaiming our property legally.”

It is probably the wisest course of action. Micaela Mantegna, a lawyer specializing in video games and intellectual property, tells me that no matter the potential strength of Ward B’s evidence, the sheer difference in scale between an indie developer and a global arms manufacturer makes any legal recourse potentially devastating for the former. As Mantegna puts it, “Litigation is clearly the worst possible outcome, particularly when it involves foreign law and overseas jurisdictions. It's an expensive and lengthy process, with potentially uncertain results. You might reach a settlement, but you have to consider all the possible downfalls before suing”. This is to say nothing of the legal complexities introduced by a US company taking action against a Russian one.

Instead Ward B now simply wants to raise awareness of what’s happened, to let people know that it believes its work is on show on a global stage, without credit. It’s not really about lost money – Sauceda makes it absolutely clear that even the original, abandoned deal was never about quick profit: “When we were in contact with Maxim Kuzin, we simply agreed on only receiving credit for the design. Ward B was to not receive any payment, and [we] saw this as a plus to have potential partnerships in the future.”

Going into private development hasn’t hurt the project too much, and Sauceda hints that Ward B is closer than ever to securing the funding it needs to take Oceanic into its next steps. His real disappointment is that those hours already spent making a dream project in spare time have been – as he sees it – co-opted by someone else, and that his team remains an invisible part of the process.

“We've dropped the goal of reclaiming our property legally.”

It’s a situation Mantegna sees as endemic in the gaming industry, particularly with smaller studios: “Unfortunately this is something that happens a lot in the indie development scene, small teams working in an informal way and covering a lot of roles simultaneously. They work super hard on their game, prioritizing resources, and maybe they don't have the time or the money to get legal advice [...] Legal education to see the red flags is very important – there might be bad actors out there, and they're going to take advantage of your naivety.”

Ultimately even Mantegna sees the most potential value for Ward B coming out of being public with its concerns, rather than any legal process. “As an activist, one of the things I feel about the gaming community is it doesn’t stand for this kind of skulduggery," she explains. "When the case goes public, they’re probably not going to buy the gun and they're going to stand for the underdog. That's the amazing power of gamers when we unite around a good cause. We’re very vocal about the things that we don't like, and we take action to change them.”

Whatever the outcome of this episode, it remains the beginning of a journey for Ward B – albeit a rockier one than the studio would've hoped for. Perhaps unexpectedly, Sauceda doesn’t fully regret what he's been through. For the developer, the fact that someone saw his team’s work and seemingly made it a reality is still an honour in its own way, and proof that his team is on the right track. He just feels that it should be Ward B’s name on that work.

“We all took this as a huge opportunity, which we're still proud to see has come to life,” he tells me. “We just wish this was handled properly.”

Joe Skrebels is IGN's Executive Editor of News. Follow him on Twitter. Have a tip for us? Want to discuss a possible story? Please send an email to newstips@ign.com.

Halo Infinite Won’t Let You Replay Campaign Missions, Breaking With Series Tradition

In a move breaking with longstanding series tradition, Halo Infinite's campaign won't let you replay its story missions - meaning that the only way to do so would be to access them again through a different save file.

In a statement issued by Microsoft to Polygon, the company confirmed that story missions in the game can't be replayed once completed. The change comes in stark contrast to previous Halo games, which have traditionally allowed players to replay missions through a dedicated menu system.

"The postgame does give you the option to keep exploring the wider environment, but for missions like the first two, where you're not on the ring yet, you can't replay from the same save file," Microsoft clarified. "You'd be able to get any remaining FOBs, targets, [and] audio logs, but the main story missions would not repeat."

As per Polygon, one of the main reasons that players aren't able to replay completed story missions stems from the game's semi-open world structure. While missions do take place in a linear order, some require players to clear different regions of the world in order to complete them. Once completed, players are usually able to head back to those areas and explore, however, in doing so you won't be able to trigger a story mission a second time.

For many players, this may feel like a shame - especially given the critical praise that Infinite's campaign has received over the past few days. In our review of Halo Infinite's campaign, we awarded it a 9/10 stating that it has "brought Halo’s single-player campaign back into contention as one of the finest out there."

Halo Infinite's campaign launches tomorrow (December 8). During the wait, many players have been getting to grips with the game's multiplayer mode, which despite running into some issues with progression and hackers, has also received praise from fans and critics alike.

For more on Halo Infinite, make sure to check out this article detailing the hidden multiplayer modes PC players have found in the game.

Jared Moore is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter.

People are Praising Spider-Man in Fortnite, Especially the Web-Slinging

Spider-Man has officially joined Fortnite Chapter 3 and people have been impressed at how smoothly Spider-Man swings around with his webs.

The friendly neighborhood superhero was introduced into Fortnite this past weekend as the game transitioned to Chapter 3, Season 1. New, Spider-Man-specific mechanics were introduced where players can now slide and even swing to imitate Spider-Man's movements.

As you can see from the clip below, Peter Parker's webs attach to buildings rather than just magically sticking to some nebulous spot in the air, providing a more realistic depiction of traversal. There's a real sense of height that makes the web-swinging feel thrilling.

Additionally, the momentum and direction at which he swings look great as well. He can also mimic web surfing by shooting a web behind a car and letting it drive off, pulling him forward. The web-slinging is popular enough that starting on December 11, any character, regardless of if they have the Spider-Man skin, will be able to web-swing.

Fortnite's version of Spider-Man has been compared to his portrayal in recent games, such as Insomniac's Marvel's Spider-Man and Square Enix's Marvel's Avengers. Particularly, as the latter's Spider-Man seems to have a rather lackluster web traversal.

In Avengers, Spider-Man effectively swings from a glass ceiling and doesn't seem to gain as much time in the air since the game is primarily designed around open fields. Now, Fornite arrives as the third challenger and it looks like people are satisfied with the game's implementation of the web-slinging hero.

It's also interesting to note that this is probably the only way that Xbox or PC owners will be able to play as Spider-Man in a modern game, as both Insomniac's game and the Spider-Man content in Marvel's Avengers are exclusive to Sony's platform (although Switch owners can play as Spider-Man in Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3).

Check out our full breakdown of what's new in Fortnite Chapter 3. In other Spider-Man news, Insomniac Games has announced that two new suits inspired by Spider-Man: No Way Home are coming to PS5's Spier-Man Remastered.

George Yang is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter @yinyangfooey

People are Praising Spider-Man in Fortnite, Especially the Web-Slinging

Spider-Man has officially joined Fortnite Chapter 3 and people have been impressed at how smoothly Spider-Man swings around with his webs.

The friendly neighborhood superhero was introduced into Fortnite this past weekend as the game transitioned to Chapter 3, Season 1. New, Spider-Man-specific mechanics were introduced where players can now slide and even swing to imitate Spider-Man's movements.

As you can see from the clip below, Peter Parker's webs attach to buildings rather than just magically sticking to some nebulous spot in the air, providing a more realistic depiction of traversal. There's a real sense of height that makes the web-swinging feel thrilling.

Additionally, the momentum and direction at which he swings look great as well. He can also mimic web surfing by shooting a web behind a car and letting it drive off, pulling him forward. The web-slinging is popular enough that starting on December 11, any character, regardless of if they have the Spider-Man skin, will be able to web-swing.

Fortnite's version of Spider-Man has been compared to his portrayal in recent games, such as Insomniac's Marvel's Spider-Man and Square Enix's Marvel's Avengers. Particularly, as the latter's Spider-Man seems to have a rather lackluster web traversal.

In Avengers, Spider-Man effectively swings from a glass ceiling and doesn't seem to gain as much time in the air since the game is primarily designed around open fields. Now, Fornite arrives as the third challenger and it looks like people are satisfied with the game's implementation of the web-slinging hero.

It's also interesting to note that this is probably the only way that Xbox or PC owners will be able to play as Spider-Man in a modern game, as both Insomniac's game and the Spider-Man content in Marvel's Avengers are exclusive to Sony's platform (although Switch owners can play as Spider-Man in Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3).

Check out our full breakdown of what's new in Fortnite Chapter 3. In other Spider-Man news, Insomniac Games has announced that two new suits inspired by Spider-Man: No Way Home are coming to PS5's Spier-Man Remastered.

George Yang is a freelance writer for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter @yinyangfooey

New Matrix Resurrections Trailer Reveals the Power of Deja Vu

The latest trailer for The Matrix Resurrections dropped Monday, providing yet another glimpse into Keanu Reeves' next chapter as Neo/Mr. Anderson, along with several major action sequences that fit right into the sci-fi kung fu stylings the franchise is known for. Watch the trailer below for the whole thing.

The new trailer focuses heavily on the feeling of deja vu, a concept from the original film that helped illustrate when a glitch in the Matrix occurred, implying that the robotic AI constructs enslaving humanity had changed something in the simulation. It's usually bad enough news to stress out even the likes of Trinity and Morpheus.

From previous trailers, we've been able to surmise that something has put Neo into a state of ignorance about the Matrix's true nature. We've also seen that Trinity returns in some form, despite the fact that she died in The Matrix Revolutions, and Neo's fate was pretty ambiguous to boot. This new trailer leans into Trinity and Neo's romantic relationship, along with appearances from Jada Pinkett-Smith's Niobe, now significantly aged, and Mindhunters' Jonathan Goff as the new Agent.

Presumably, Neo and Trinity will try desperately to reunite while dealing with whatever else the Matrix has to throw at them, including countless soldiers, agents, and an explosive high speed train ride through a field of sakura blossom trees.

The Matrix Resurrections is out in theaters on December 22, 2021 and on HBO Max on the same date, but only for one month before being removed. You can read more about how Resurrections has more humor and a new look compared to past films, too.

Joseph Knoop is a writer/producer/deja dude for IGN.

New Matrix Resurrections Trailer Reveals the Power of Deja Vu

The latest trailer for The Matrix Resurrections dropped Monday, providing yet another glimpse into Keanu Reeves' next chapter as Neo/Mr. Anderson, along with several major action sequences that fit right into the sci-fi kung fu stylings the franchise is known for. Watch the trailer below for the whole thing.

The new trailer focuses heavily on the feeling of deja vu, a concept from the original film that helped illustrate when a glitch in the Matrix occurred, implying that the robotic AI constructs enslaving humanity had changed something in the simulation. It's usually bad enough news to stress out even the likes of Trinity and Morpheus.

From previous trailers, we've been able to surmise that something has put Neo into a state of ignorance about the Matrix's true nature. We've also seen that Trinity returns in some form, despite the fact that she died in The Matrix Revolutions, and Neo's fate was pretty ambiguous to boot. This new trailer leans into Trinity and Neo's romantic relationship, along with appearances from Jada Pinkett-Smith's Niobe, now significantly aged, and Mindhunters' Jonathan Goff as the new Agent.

Presumably, Neo and Trinity will try desperately to reunite while dealing with whatever else the Matrix has to throw at them, including countless soldiers, agents, and an explosive high speed train ride through a field of sakura blossom trees.

The Matrix Resurrections is out in theaters on December 22, 2021 and on HBO Max on the same date, but only for one month before being removed. You can read more about how Resurrections has more humor and a new look compared to past films, too.

Joseph Knoop is a writer/producer/deja dude for IGN.

Colin Farrell Will Star As Penguin In The Batman Spinoff Series For HBO Max

Colin Farrell has apparently signed on to reprise his role of The Penguin/Oswald Cobblepot in the rumored Penguin spinoff series.

Variety reports that Farrell has signed on to play Penguin in the spinoff show of The Batman for HBO Max. The actor is already set to play Oswald Cobblepot alongside Robert Pattinson's Bruce Wayne in Matt Reeves' The Batman next March.

Initial reports came out earlier this Fall that the spinoff was in the works, but Farrell had not officially signed on at that time. The series is apparently going to dive into the Penguin's rise in Gotham City's criminal underworld. Variety says Lauren LeFranc is set to write the script. The Batman director Matt Reeves and producer Dylan Clark will reportedly serve as executive producers on the Penguin series.

A full show means a lot time to delve into Farrell's version of the Penguin, who says that he only appears in "five or six scenes" of The Batman.

Even though we haven't seen Farrell's full performance as the iconic villain yet, he's already got at least one big stamp of approval. Danny DeVito, who famously played Penguin in 1992's Batman Returns, is excited to see Farrell's take on the character, saying, "I love Colin Farrell. He’s one of my favorite actors. I can’t wait!”

The Penguin show would be the second spinoff for The Batman movie. We already know a spinoff focusing on Gotham PD is in development. For more while you wait for The Batman and the Penguin spinoff show, check out our breakdown of The Batman's most recent trailer.

Logan Plant is a freelance writer for IGN. You can find him on Twitter @LoganJPlant.

Colin Farrell Will Star As Penguin In The Batman Spinoff Series For HBO Max

Colin Farrell has apparently signed on to reprise his role of The Penguin/Oswald Cobblepot in the rumored Penguin spinoff series.

Variety reports that Farrell has signed on to play Penguin in the spinoff show of The Batman for HBO Max. The actor is already set to play Oswald Cobblepot alongside Robert Pattinson's Bruce Wayne in Matt Reeves' The Batman next March.

Initial reports came out earlier this Fall that the spinoff was in the works, but Farrell had not officially signed on at that time. The series is apparently going to dive into the Penguin's rise in Gotham City's criminal underworld. Variety says Lauren LeFranc is set to write the script. The Batman director Matt Reeves and producer Dylan Clark will reportedly serve as executive producers on the Penguin series.

A full show means a lot time to delve into Farrell's version of the Penguin, who says that he only appears in "five or six scenes" of The Batman.

Even though we haven't seen Farrell's full performance as the iconic villain yet, he's already got at least one big stamp of approval. Danny DeVito, who famously played Penguin in 1992's Batman Returns, is excited to see Farrell's take on the character, saying, "I love Colin Farrell. He’s one of my favorite actors. I can’t wait!”

The Penguin show would be the second spinoff for The Batman movie. We already know a spinoff focusing on Gotham PD is in development. For more while you wait for The Batman and the Penguin spinoff show, check out our breakdown of The Batman's most recent trailer.

Logan Plant is a freelance writer for IGN. You can find him on Twitter @LoganJPlant.